I was sitting here this morning, wondering what my next post on this blog would be about. I think I am going to write a post about all these “bull shit” laws that we as truck drivers have to deal with day in and day out. I know some of these laws are put into place to help save lives and such. But, some are just BS in my opinion.

The no engine brake law, for instance. FYI - I have no problem complying with this law within city limits, but I have a big problem is now every little town, burg, and Burroughs wants in on the revenue. Some places are charging “big” bucks for this! Also, why would anyone comply with this law when the freaking sign is posted at the top of a very long hill, mountain, etc. that leads down into a small city? I’m not going to, and I don’t think any smart truck driver would.

A engine brake, Jake brake, engine retarder, etc. is a safety tool added to trucks now days to keep the brakes from fading, while going down a hill, MT, etc. I use mine all the time, except within a city limit.

Most of these places that implemented this law, were built after and along side major interstates. The people who knowingly built there house beside a busy interstate shouldn’t have the right to get a No engine Brake sign added to the side of the road. These places make me wish, I was back in my “Coal Hauling” days when I had a truck with 8″ stacks on it.

I know a lot of the “old school” truck drivers reading this are thinking “we used to do it” without engine brakes years ago. Well, all I got to say is “I don’t care, just because you did something for years doesn’t mean you been doing it right for years”. I love the sound of them loud Jake brakes…

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Another stupid law is all these places putting into act this “No idle” law. WTF? If it is cold out, how are we as truck drivers suppose to be in compliance and abide by the rules enforced upon us first? The rules state we must have uninterrupted rest for 10 hours. How, am I suppose to get uninterrupted rest when I am freezing cold? Same applies when it is hot. I don’t know about you all, but I have my air conditioner on if it is warmer than 40 degrees, it is on low but still on. I sleep better when I am cool.

I just wonder if these “idiots” who wrote these laws, go home and turn the A/C on when it is hot out? Or turn the heat on when it is cold? Yea, they have started putting APU’s in some trucks, but still this is merely to save fuel. Still a lot of places will not allow these either. “Idle Air” is a plus, but not widely enough available yet, and when/if it is available they will probably just jack the price up.

I like this response I read from The Truckers Forum - Simple solution to the problem, we no longer haul to states that have BS laws like this and who enforce them. Our lives are no longer complicated, and they can’t get products they need or extort money from us for BS laws. You can go to the NHTSA and see what the Federal government mandates as needed equipment for safe operation to include air conditioning and heat. Federal trucking law states a driver is to have a good uninterrupted rest before coming on duty. I was asleep, woke up because my truck was running and I had the heat on to be comfortable in 30 degree weather. The officer told me this was illegal and I was going to get a ticket. I agreed he was right. I broke the local ordinance for idling. I told him to write the ticket, and I would personally drive over his squad and claim I was awakened illegally and forced to drive when out of hours and lost control of my truck because the officer had forced me to operate a commercial motor vehicle out of compliance without uninterrupted rest because I cant run my truck to have heat or air so therefore I must drive to have the engine running. Our company attorneys would be more than glad to contest this in a Federal court of law. The officer told me I was an ass, I replied with 47 years and someone finally noticed. I was then left alone.

This is the best response I have read in a long while. I think if we could all join/unite together we could make some big differences, in today’s trucking industry.

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